Response to the CPC’s Unauthorized, Unofficial Statement on Arts Policy

(This letter is written in direct response to Daniel Karasik’s semi-satirical(?) post about the CPC’s arts policy. Which was in turn a response to Fannina Waubert de Puiseau’s open letter to the CPC.)

 Dear Sir,

Thank you for your missive of September the 10th, re: the Unofficial, Unauthorized Conservative Party of Canada’s Policy Position on the Arts. It was an absorbing read, and, typical of the CPC’s remarks on such issues more generally, rather dazzling in the sheer volume of misremembered facts and obfuscated issues. In this, your party is truly Canada’s leader.

This is not to say that there is nothing of value or truth in the letter; far from it. I myself have long complained of artists’ general complacency in terms of advocacy or activism. It is certainly true that the artistic community at large has alienated itself from the political process for a long time. We have not made our case to the Canadian population with anywhere near the necessary urgency or verve. We do not pay attention to the key elections that can have the most meaningful long-term influence on the Canadian art scene – school trusteeship. In fact, the absence of artists who run for school board trustee positions is doubly glaring; it’s a well-paid, part-time job, after all, and who would say there’s abundance of those?

I concede that general point. It isn’t a small concession on my part. Nevertheless, the ensuing bouts of free-association in the, say, latter 3/4 of your statement require my attention as a Canadian citizen. Though I did not vote for your party, I feel an unfamiliar – if not unwelcome – stirring of patriotism in my gut, and believe it is my Canadianly duty to correct you on certain points with respect to the existing facts. My hope is that this will improve your governance overall.

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News round-up for 07.09.2013,

1. Surveillance

  • Latest revelations from Glenn Greenwald (using documents leaked by Edward Snowden) show that the NSA spends millions of taxpayer cash to fund programs designed to hack into the encryption software of “the big Four” – Hotmail, Google, Facebook, & Yahoo.
  • In response, legislation is being proposed by Rep. Rush D. Holt Jr.
  • New documents show the NSA’s targeting of Mexican & Brazilian presidents.

2. Egypt

  • Hours ago, the Egyptian military government attacked what they described as “Islamic militants” in the Sinai.
  • In an eerie echo of Morsi’s government, the military regime has decided to “dissolve” the opposition Muslim Brotherhood.
  • Egyptian Minister of the Interior survives assassination attempt.

3. Syria

  • Tony Burman on why bomibng Syria is a bad idea (& what can be done instead).
  • EU urges the US to reconsider its position on Syria; Catherine Ashton correctly observes that an attack would be a “violation of international law.”
  • Stephen Harper, ever the US’s obedient dog, makes the case for military attacks in Syria.

4. GITMO

  • A powerful new documentary, “Life After Gitmo” remains unavailable to viewers in the United States:

 5. Quebec values Charter

  • Good piece on the PQ’s proto-facistic new legislation.
  • Apparently, according to Frau Marois, people “in England…throw bombs at each other because of multiculturalism.”

6. Keystone XL Pipeline

  • Prime Minister Stephen Harper sends Obama a personal letter offering joint action to reduce greenhouse emissions, in an effort to “win” the pipeline.

News round-up for 05.09.2013.

1. Syria

  • Obama wins support of the House Foreign Relations Committee for a strike on Syria.
  • UN warns that a US military strike without UN approval would be illegal under international law.
  • John Kerry misrepresents the number of dead in chemical weapons attack.
  • Prime Minister Stephen Harper is, apparently, a “reluctant convert” of military intervention.
  • From DemocracyNow, as superb interview with Rep. Alan Grayson:

2. Chelsea Manning

3. Domestic surveillance

  • A primer in what Canadians need to know about CSEC spying.
  • Despite protest, the government is still strying to keep its spying program in the dark.
  • Fantastic overview from the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.

4. Mining

  • The international community condemns Barrick Gold’s attempt to prevent rape victims from seeking justice

 

 

New round-up for 20.08.2013

1. NSA Wiretapping scandal, Glenn Greenwald, & the Guardian

  • In the wake of journalist Glenn Greenwald’s publication of article based on the leaks of whistleblower Edward Snowdene, the British government used a bizarre terrorism clause called “Schedule 7” to justify the 9-hour detention of Greenwald’s partner David Miranda, as well as the confiscation of his cellphone, laptop, & USB sticks. Miranda & Greenwald have launched legal action against the British government. US officials deny any involvement.
  • Meanwhile, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger claims that British intelligence agents forced him to physically destroy the computers containing Snowden’s leaked documents. Rusbridger says The Guardian will continue to publish stories based on the documents, but “not from London.”

2. Egypt

  • The Muslim Brotherhood’s leader Mohammed Badie has been arrested in his home in Cairo by the military authorities. There is no word on whether he has been charged with any particular crime, or if he will be.

3. Stephen Harper prorogues parliament…again

  • Predictably, the ugly precdent set by the last prorogation is being followed to its logical conclusion.